Colors of Christmas

For sure red and green are apart of our every day, and capture our attention.  If you stop and look around, whether you are in the city or the country, red and green are all around us.  Most of us would probably say that the colors red and green most remind us of Christmas.  After going through some of my own photos, I realized that red and green are apart of so many of my images.  This made me curious, so I did a little quick search on the color theory of red and green. Here are a few fun facts on what I found, and a few of my own images.

Red:

Red is one of the top two favorite colors of all people. Red is the most popular color used on flags in the world. Approximately 77% of all flags include red. Red is the international color for stop. The history of languages reveals that red is the first color after black and white. (All languages have words for black and white. If a third hue exists, it is red.) Red captures attention. It is one of the most visible colors, second only to yellow – which explains why it is used on fire engines and stop signs to trigger alertness. Red focuses behind the retina which forces the lens grows more convex to pull it forward. Therefore, we perceive that red areas are moving forward. This may explain why red captures attention. Eight percent of the male population has a red-green color vision deficiency and cannot see red at all.

Green:

Green is universally associated with nature. Green symbolizes ecology and the environment. Traffic lights are green all over the world. Approximately 5% – 8% of men and 0.5% of women of the world are born colorblind. People who are protans (red weak) and deutans (green weak) comprise 99% of this group. Some European countries have outlined certain traffic light colors so that it is clear which is green and which is red, by the color that has a rectangle around it. Some states in the U.S. have placed diagonal lines through green traffic lights as an aid for the colorblindness. Red and Green are opposite on the color wheel. They are complementary colors. When you mix red and green, you get brown.

undefinedundefinedundefinedundefinedundefinedundefinedundefined Color facts were found at www.colormatters.com

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